2019 Fabulous Festival of Film Programs

A note on the general content of our programs: Most programs have content that may be mature or disturbing to some viewers. We invite you to contact Debbie, Co-Artistic Director, for further information on specific program.

debbie.ebanks@gmail.com, 705-896-6800



Saugeen Takes on Film Shorts

9:30 pm | Thursday, July 18 | Hanover Drive-In, followed by Flow, programmed by Julie René de Cotret
6:00 pm | Saturday, July 27 | James Mason Memorial Culture and Recreation Centre

Sharon Isaac and Kelsey Diamond, Thunder Rolling Home, 2019
Cassidy Ritchie, Tiffany Kewageshig with Adrian Kahgee, Lori Kewaquom, Tune-In, 2019
Natalka Pucan, The Ancestors’ Gift, 2019

This year, the Festival premieres three short films made in the Saugeen Takes on Film workshop. By animating archival photographs, artifacts, and traditional knowledge, the filmmakers tap into their vibrant community. Each film comes from a deeply personal place, sensitively navigating past trauma, ancestral presence and overcoming challenges. Friends and families of several generations are pictured in these films and bear witness to this moment in time. The films were made with hand-processing techniques that use flowers to replace chemicals, resulting in an aesthetic that calls to mind abstract painting and mark-making, from ancient times to contemporary painting. More importantly, the flowers have the potential to carry through teachings and healing properties of these plants into the material and subject matter of the film and onto the viewer.  
This project is a result of a collaboration of the Saugeen First Nation Employment and Training Centre, Fabulous Festival of Fringe Film, the Film Farm, and Archive/Counter Archive. We gratefully acknowledge the support of the Ontario Arts Council. 
Following Saugeen Takes on Films are a series of animated shorts and youth films for the whole family selected from the National Film Board’s collection of Indigenous-made films. 






Flow
Programmed by Julie Rene´de Cotret

9:30pm | Thursday, July 18 | Hanover Drive-In Theatre
Following Saugeen Takes on Film Shorts
Total run time: 60 minutes
Patrick Bernachez. Chrysalide Empereur (one part of Whole Chrysalides/Fashion Plaza 2006-2009), 11:00 min
A traveling shot circles insistently around a black BMW bathed in an oppressive dark light. The protagonist lights a cigarette while sitting at the steering wheel, apparently unperturbed as water slowly fills the interior. With each slow and mesmerizing camera rotation the water level rises until the man is completely submerged...   

Chris Myhr. Fathoms: The Weight of Smoke, 2018. 10:00 min
Fathoms: The Weight of Smoke examines the interrelationships between culture and natural water systems. Images of debris clouds hovering above the Atlantic seafloor are juxtaposed with abstracted motion-graphic animations of selected marine artefacts.

soft turns. EMATERIAL, 2019. 10:10 min
The series EMATERIAL explores the material embodiment of the digital by showing the submersion and dissolution of inkjet photographs depicting discarded, burning e-waste. These images capture the unsafe handling of electronic waste, a toxic scavenging industry exported to the world’s most vulnerable communities that can never be fully erased.  

Jenn E. Norton. The Weeping Brook, 2019, 2:30 min 
The Weeping Brook explores the movement of a river's current as it gently sweeps the tendrils of submerged plants.  In the undulating greenery and flittering silt emerges a body that has long been at rest, covered in the growth of algae and seagrass.  

Amanda Strong. How to Steal a Canoe, 2016, 4:10 min
A young Nishnaabeg woman and an old Nishnaabeg man rescue a canoe from a museum and return it to the lake where it was meant to be.

Caroline Monnet. Mobilize, 2015, 3:32 min 
Guided expertly by those who live on the land and driven by the pulse of the natural world, Mobilize takes us on an exhilarating journey from the far north to the urban south. Over every landscape, in all conditions, everyday life flows with strength, skill and extreme competence. The fearless polar punk rhythms of Tanya Tagaq’s Uja underscore the perpetual negotiation between the modern and traditional by a people always moving forward.
 
Tasman Richardson. Darkness is to space as silence is to sound, 2018, 16:00 min
By coupling satellite video surveillance and radio frequency applications, Tasman Richardson programs geographical glimpses and their specific sonorities, into a three-channel piece adapted to be viewed on a single screen. Views depict human population density concentrated along shorelines and the tremendous human devastation of the planet. 






Remixology
A selection of films by Mike Hoolboom programmed by Jorge Lozano

6:00pm | Friday, July 19 | Garafraxa Cafe
Run Time: 70min
Lions, 2018, 1:48 min
Commissioned as an intro for artist’s shorts by the Alchemy Fest in Scotland. 
They hooked up with Regional Screen Scotland, an org that brings work through the Scottish Highlands and Islands with a large truck called The Screen Machine. I was asked to make a “how to watch experimental film” piece, between 1-3 minutes long, which would run before a program of 3-4 shorts, and then the feature film. Tour sponsors weren’t impressed though, so this one went straight to Vimeo.

In the Future, 1998, 3:30 min
Originally made at Charles Street Video in 1998, recut 20years later at home. Part one of the nine-part feature Imitations of Life (2003). 
“In a tightly constructed barrage of old Hollywood images and more, he searches the past to illuminate our future, producing a collage shining with gestures and fixed looks that touch us deeply in their familiarity. In the Future is a film steeped in culture, one of the most concise and poetic of its kind." (Barbara Goslawski, Take One)

In My Car, 1998, 5:00 min
Originally made at Charles Street Video in 1998, recut in 2018 at home. Part six of the nine-part feature Imitations of Life (2003).
“Shakespeare stole. Cervantes plundered. T.S. Eliot once remarked that mediocre artists borrow, great artists steal. Later in the 20th century, the idea of theft became theorized, valorized and championed as ‘postmodern pastiche.’ So where does this place Mike Hoolboom? His latest effort, In My Car, is a montage of stolen images, sequences and music… the film's narrative concoction is made both more dense and more clear as Hoolboom has his own poem scroll across the screen. The poetic text explores, in its tale of a dying brother, ideas of memory, faith, technology, solitude and imagination. Haunting, elegiac and almost tangibly melancholy, In My Car is a short, devastating journey. With his thievery and his originality, perhaps Hoolboom has fashioned a premillennial, media-saturated visual vocabulary of our dying century.” Tom McSorley

Tradition, 2004, 7:24 min
Part 5 of 7-part bio-feature Public Lighting (2004).
“Tradition plays out the forgetting of the new as the handmaiden of the corporate and materialist tsunami engulfing traditional China.” Dirk de Bruyn “Tradition tells a generational tale of forgetting and repetition, set on two continents. Once again Hoolboom combines his own film material with found footage, clips and icons, interweaving texts and voice-overs. These portraits (which are sometimes city portraits as well) and meditations each represent a way of being, of recounting and of telling. Each perspective is also a retrospective. The past is derived from a domain of pictures, which on the one hand don’t belong to the subject, but on the other hand provide their roots of memory and subjectivity. They are spoken by language. Their personalities are apertures for external pictures and sound.” Esma Moukhtar, Montevideo Catalogue.

Hiro, 2004, 11:25 min
Part 6 of 7-part bio-feature Public Lighting (2004).
“A brilliantly edited, highly impressionistic segment on Japanese photographer Hiro Kanagawa as he looks for nighttime subjects and stumbles across a corpse.” Robert Koehler, Variety) “The fifth installment represents the most somber, estranged, and austere portrait in its exposition of the camera as testament of human history. Told from the perspective of a silent, introspective photographer named Hiro who serves as an unobtrusive chronicler of night-time cityscapes juxtaposed against images of war-ravaged towns (including the ruins of post-atomic bombing Hiroshima), Hoolboom similarly evokes the theme of a culturally endemic collective amnesia (in the inclusion of a fluff commercial spot) explored by Chris Marker's Level Five and in the haunted memory of the present that pervades Alain Resnais' early feature films. Devoid of dialogue, subtitles, overlaid texts - in essence, all words - the sequence becomes a reflection of humanity as an eternal, impotent, mute witness to barbarism and man-made tragedy.” Posted by Acquarello, Nov. 28, 2005. 

Nursing History, 2018, 4:00 min
In a Red Cross hospital in Vietnam, the young white nurse tends his wounds. Drawn from the archives of the Red Cross in Geneva.

Where the Night is Going, 2019, 8:00 min
 “Where the Night is Going takes the viewer into an over-controlled environment, a tawdry celebration of the ability to congeal form into money and power. It’s a place where many people would find themselves asking “what am I doing here?” The kind of place where by squinting the right way and looking through an alcoholic haze can you convince yourself you’re having a good time. Translating the experience into a dialog of desire, Hoolboom finds a complex and contrapuntal film form to vividly describe a form of seduction which we are all vulnerable to.” David Finkelstein.

27 Thoughts About My Father, 2019, 25:00 min
“Mike Hoolboom reflects in 27 brief scenes on the life of his father, who died in June 2017. Using home movies, snapshots and found footage, he creates a portrait of an exceedingly clever, yet evanescent father figure haunted by the war that sent his own father to a concentration camp. Ultimately the family moved to Canada. This political history, intertwining dreams and personal experience, seems loose and associative, but first impressions can be deceiving.” International Film Festival Rotterdam.






Special Projects
Programmed by the Grey Zone Collective

Lisa Jackson, Biidaaban: First Light, 2018
1 pm | Thursday, July 17 | Camp McGovern
2 pm – 8 pm | Saturday, July 20 | Durham Arena
4 pm – 8 pm | Saturday, July 27 | James Mason Culture and Recreation Centre

An award-winning Virtual Reality film.
The town square is flooded. The city’s infrastructure has merged with local flora. In this radically different future, people have found a connection to the past. Biidaaban: First Light illuminates how the original languages of this land can provide a framework for understanding our place in a reconciled version of Canada’s largest urban environment.”  
Lisa Jackson (Anishinaabe) is one of Canada’s most celebrated contemporary artists working in film and VR. In Biidaaban: First Light, Lisa joins forces with 3D artist Mathew Borrett to create a future for Canada’s largest urban centre from an Indigenous female perspective. 

Clayton Windatt, The Space Between Us, 2019
2:30; 4:30; 7:30 pm | Saturday, July 20 | Durham Arena
Installation+Performance 
What binds people and regions to one another? What are the messages that unify us or drive us apart? THE SPACE BETWEEN US is a series of community-engaged activations exploring the spaces between arts advocates and communities they set out to represent. The project is a body of text-based works, poems and spoken word performances that engage audiences from North Bay, Ontario through the Sun dog theatre festival, and in Durham, Ontario through the Fabulous Festival and Fringe Film. Exploratory discussions on-site during each festival create new works with community in real-time. Each performance will be a reflection of a moment, a person and/or a situation where things have gone very well or had catastrophic results. The public engagements will act as a rallying call for festival patrons to participate and get involved.  

Clayton Windatt is a Métis non–binary multi-artist living and working in Sturgeon Falls, Ontario. With an extensive history working in Artist-Run Culture and Community Arts, Clayton was also Executive Director of the Aboriginal Curatorial Collective and worked on national and global issues and social justice. Clayton is an active film director with works featured in festivals such as ImagineNative and the Toronto International Film Festival. Clayton works in/with community, design, communications, curation, performance, theatre, technology, consulting, and is a very active writer, filmmaker and visual-media artist. 

Adrian Kahgee and Debbie Ebanks Schlums, Mnaandendmowin: Time Immemorial, an excerpt
2 pm – 8 pm | Saturday, July 20 | Durham Arena
4 pm – 8 pm | Saturday, July 27 | James Mason Culture and Recreation Centre
Interactive Installation 
As Co-Artistic Directors and artist collaborators, we were thinking about a way to engage audiences and integrate land acknowledgements in an embodied way. They have taken a loom for wampum-renewal-making from a previous performance and now place it at the entrance to the major venues to entice interaction with the meaning of a land acknowledgement. 
 
Cassidy Ritchie, Tiffany Kewageshig with Adrian Kahgee and Lori Kewaquom, Tune In, 2019
2 pm - 8 pm | Saturday, July 27 | James Mason Culture & Rec Centre
Film Installation 
Tune In, is a youth directed film installation project that accentuates the desires and hopes of this next generation. Ishkiniikwek, a young women’s group from Saugeen First Nation explore through this installation the idea of ‘life with purpose’. When we walk the good path and are living the good life or mino- bimaadziwin we are said to be tuned in. Our path personally and collectively has become noisy and blurred from many years of intergenerational trauma brought about from colonialism. For some the good path, miskwo miikaan ndo naapnidoon, has been found once again but for many, including our youth that path is not so clear. Film images of youthfulness remind us of the innocence of youth and our desire for love, hope and dreams. However, looming in the background are realities that our youth are increasingly being exposed to and participating in. Issues that are taking over and plaguing many communities across the country. Ishkiniikwek, implore parents, adults, leaders and the country at large, to stand up with them and help make a change. Their message of resilience, hope and healing shines through loudest, as it is through this process that we will Tune In and find mino-bimaadaziwin once again. 







Redacting Bodies
Programmed by Alexandra Gelis

3:00pm | Saturday, July 20 | Durham Arena
Approx. Total Run Time: 67 min
Heather Frise and Mike Hoolboom, The Bed and the Street, 2018, 4:30 min Canada 
A love story set in the global anti-austerity demonstrations. As citizens take back their streets, two women meet and fall in love. What geometry of desire will help overthrow the state? What micro-politics of sharing and communality will provide fuel for demonstrations that will remove and replace the neo-liberal consensus? Cast in a palimpsest of images and sounds, as if there were no way to separate inside and out, the street and the bedroom. 

Rehab Nazzal, Bodies in Motion, 2017, 3:00 min Canada/Palestine
Bodies in Motion deals with bodies as sites of oppression as well as sites of resistance. The piece explores the logic of bodily movement, the gestural language of slinging stones at the occupation forces by Palestinian youth. It consists of hundreds of images of Palestinians protesters photographed in Palestine in 2015-2016 during regular protests against Israel’s colonial oppression. Converted into silhouettes, the images are punctuated with black and white photographs of individual protesters, connecting the real with the symbolic, the past with the present, and emphasizing the relation between individual and collective bodies. 

Kami Chisholm, Overpass, 2015, 5:00 min, USA/Canada
Beginning with a seeming ordinary afternoon drive down a Los Angeles highway, Overpass weaves together intimate stories of histories of racial and domestic violence against the backdrop of the infamous OJ Simpson car chase in 1994. In this lyrical, experimental short, filmmaker Kami Chisholm draws from television news reports, archival footage, and her own family history to explore the gaps between celebrity spectacle and the mundane realities of interpersonal violence endemic to US society. 
 
Midi Onodera, Grief Without Fantasy (2012), 2017, 1:37 min 
Filmmaker Midi Onodera approached writer Ronna Bloom to create short videos based on her poetry. Grief Without Fantasy is one of the results. 
 
Sojin Chun, Treasure Hill Camouflage, 2016, 2:18 min 
Treasure Hill Camouflage light-heartedly examines the notion of assimilation through performances for video while examining cultural and physical camouflage as a method of survival.  In Taiwan, my natural Asian appearance deceives my “real” identity, allowing me to camouflage as Chinese or Taiwanese.  Camouflaging is also a military technique and a method of survival, a tactic to blend into the landscape in order to stay alive. 
 
Josephine Massarella, 165708, 2017, 6:37 min Canada
Shot entirely in 16mm black and white film using single frame photography, 165708 employs in-camera techniques and chemical manipulation of processed film to produce an eidetic study of temporal elasticity. Techniques include flicker, time-lapse, light painting, stop motion, tinting, and toning. Combined with cycles of alternating exposed frames, these methods imbue the work with a rhythmic magnetism, apparent both in the tempo and the aesthetic of the images. 
Exploring the capacity of the medium to express various notions of time, the film begins with a woman looking out from the shoreline. This acts as a point of departure to disparate yet interconnected sequences, which prompt the viewer to engage in a structurally unique mode of inquiry and experience. A dynamic original score by the acclaimed composer Graham Stewart accompanies the film. 
 
Weibin Wang, Stroke, 2017, 5:18 min, Canada/China 
Through a Skype call, the filmmaker investigates the cause of his grandfather’s illness. The film uses abstract imagery to capture the inner conflicts of a traditional Shanghainese home. 
 
Thirza Cuthand, Thirza Cuthand is an Indian Within the Meaning of the Indian Act, 2017, 8:56 min, Canada
Contemplating mixed race identity in Canada, Cuthand presents us with images of blood ties and land ties for indigenous people, and questions the use of the words "white passing" and "light skinned." As a light skinned indigenous woman, Cuthand reiterates that racism and discrimination still happen for her, just in different ways. Community belonging is contrasted with the difference experiences she has from her darker skinned family. Ultimately, a video with more questions than answers, it situates the artist's body in historical trauma and ongoing colonial survival. 
 
Julieta Maria, Limpia, 2013, 2:25 min, Canada/Columbia 
It means 'to clean', but in the Colombian Caribbean it also means to reprimand through spanking. Through this action, the video reveals the healing and authority role of a mother. Limpia has several meanings. 
 
Jorge Lozano, Recreactions (From The House in Ruins 1 of 2), 2017, 5:00 min, Canada/Columbia 
Recreactions is a work about (re)inhabiting displacement. It is a response to the infrastructural dispositions that enable the uncovering of accidental force relations hidden within the folds of everyday encounters (abandoned spaces) with autobiographical memories.  
 
Dan Browne, Generation, 2017, 2:00 min, Canada 
Generations explores the life cycles of a garden visit. 
 
Rebecca Garrett, search>site>scan>three sisters, 2003-2018, 20 min Canada 
search>site>scan>three sisters is an evolving video performance that is the offshoot of a research and web based archive and video project called search that was begun in 2003. Search explores the historical role and influence of colonial epistemologies and military on visual technologies and how these intervene in our relations to the land, our bodies and communities. 
In the anthropocene, representation and survival are altered, engendering a radically transformed architecture of desire. The video frame cannot contain the generation of symbolic forms that are material, organic, inter-relational, and move out as performance into the actual space of possibility and reciprocity. 






When the frame slips, someplace between tomorrow and yesterday
Curated by Christina Battle

5:00pm | Saturday, July 20 | Durham Arena
Approx. total run time: 60 min
belit sağ (Turkish, lives & works in Amsterdam), what remains / geriye kalanlar, 2018, 7:05 min
what remains is constructed from images that sag shot and gathered during 2015 and 2016 in Cizre, a primarily Kurdish town in Turkey on the Syrian border, as well as found footage from all over Turkey from the same period. A focus of the work is the artist’s footage of collective Kurdish mourning practices, and looking at how images of the dead are used in these practices. sag approaches her subject both philosophically and emotionally, and is driven to find a way of making work that is theoretically rigorous and morally and ethically compassionate. 
‘This video is an attempt at ‘giving the images back to the ones who gave them to us’, it aims to 'allow the ghosts to come back', and revisit the images, re-think the recent history… On the one hand video can manipulate, on the other it can heal, it can co-conspire, help you go back and forth, re-visit, refresh the memory, it can also make you re-live the violence as well, it is an earthly friend that connects you to many beings stuck between life and death, past and present.’ 

Lydia Moyer (USA), The Forcing (no. 1), 2015, 9.46 min
Part one of a series of collages that muddle the quiet detail of flora and fauna with the chaotic noise of mass upheaval, building tension through the offset of sound and image. Made in response to the turbulence of contemporary US American life, these works ask viewers to ride the waves of the capitalocene, placing climate change and the struggle for social justice side-by-side on the cosmic continuum. 

Dan Browne (Canada), Gulf, 2016, 4:20 min 
This film was shot on the north shore of Cuba looking towards the Gulf of Mexico, just months before 4.9 million barrels of oil was spilled by Deepwater Horizon between April 20-July 15, 2010. Wave patterns fill the frame, tearing apart the filmstrip itself. 
 
Parastoo Anoushahpour, Faraz Anoushahpour, Ryan Ferko (Canada), Chooka, 2018, 21:00 min 
In 1973, the Shah of Iran commissioned the construction of a paper factory in the lush northern province of Gilan. Foreign engineers from Canada and the United States were brought to develop and run the facility, bringing with them their families as well as a species of pine tree previously unknown to the region. Their stay, however, came to a sudden halt in 1979 with the Iranian revolution forcing them to flee the site overnight. 

Chooka unfolds between the site of this factory and a rural family house located in a nearby village. Coinciding with the construction of the factory, this family hosted the production of Bahram Beyzaie’s film, The Stranger and The Fog. Shot in the same village, the film begins when an unconscious stranger drifts ashore in a small boat. After the revolution, Beyzaie returned to the same house to produce his film Bashu, The Little Stranger, about a young war refugee who escapes the south and ends up alone in a small northern village.  
 
Returning to this landscape 40 years later, we meet the family again. It is summer and the grandfather of the family who hosted Beyzaie has passed away. His adult son is working at the paper factory while his grandson, between English classes, shows us the secret corners of his family’s house. Mediated through screens and photography, Chooka weaves original material with elements of archival documentary footage and fragments of Beyzaie’s cinema to explore the entangled relationship between a stranger and a host, a factory and a village, a film crew and a family, foreign trees and a landscape.  
 
Commissioned by Liaison of Independent Filmmakers of Toronto (LIFT) as part of the Jacques Madvo Collection Project 

Metrah Pashaee (USA), Burn Day, 2015, 4:00 min 
In the peak of the day, a prairie fire begins to smolder. 

Terra Long (Canada), 350 MYA, 2016, 4:55 min
In Terra Long's 350 MYA, a sheet whips before the camera, shaped by the same wind that forms the rigid, undulating lines of sand below it as the film conjures the continued presence of the now-vanished Rheic Ocean in the Tafilalet region of the arid Sahara Desert. 
 
Lydia Moyer (USA), The Forcing (no. 2), 2016, 7:00 min  
Part one of a series of collages that muddle the quiet detail of flora and fauna with the chaotic noise of mass upheaval, building tension through the offset of sound and image. Made in response to the turbulence of contemporary US American life, these works ask viewers to ride the waves of the capitalocene, placing climate change and the struggle for social justice side-by-side on the cosmic continuum. 






Love and Disability
Programmed by Joschi Shea

8:00pm | Saturday, July 20 | Durham Arena
Total Run Time: 62 min
Audience warning: mature content
Exploring sexuality is a complicated and difficult activity in a young person’s life. Especially if you have a disability. In this program you will see how a range of people are discovering intimacy, love and sex across a spectrum of bodies, abilities and orientations. 

Jari Osborne, Picture This, 2017, 33:00 min Canada 
Picture This is a documentary that gives us a view into the life of Andrew Gurza, a Toronto activist promoting a positive outlook about disability, queerness, sexuality and body image. He is outspoken in his writing, podcasts and conversation about his experiences, both good and bad. His feelings are: “I don’t accept that I have to stay in my chair and be lonely and untouched.” Andrew describes the transactional touching that he experiences from his personal care workers, and how different it is from the real touching that he craves. He is careful to explain that even sex workers can’t provide what he is looking for. He is surrounded by friends and like-minded advocates who are tackling the subject head-on, with projects like Deliciously Disabled, a sex-positive play party. 

Anaïs Barbeau-Lavalette & André Turpin, Prends-Moi, 2014, 10:00 min Canada 
In Prends-moi a young, disabled couple living in a nursing home are struggling to have sex. The home, in Quebec, has an “intimacy room” where they are brought by an attendant named Mani. He thinks that it’s weird that he has to help. Therefore, he is mean to the male character.  We see him roughly pulling off the young man’s Attend.  The young woman, who is naked and rubbing herself, is frustrated by Mani’s unwillingness to bring her closer to her young man.  They both feel it is not working.  Mani’s supervisor reminds him that he has to do the job.  The second time the young couple goes to the intimacy room, Mani is much more helpful, and they have a much better experience. At the end of the film the other residents are isolated because they have no love life.  

Joshua Tate, Guest Room, 2015, 12:48 min USA 
The Guest Room is a dramatic, romantic and warm film about two people, Daniel and Amber, who have Down’s Syndrome.  They have sex but forgot the condom. They take a pregnancy test and it is positive. She buys Plan B, but it’s not clear if she used it. Daniel tries to propose because he wants to help. Amber say she needs to wait. The parents are scared about them having a baby who has 50% chance of having Down’s Syndrome. Amber’s sister, who is unhappy about the parents’ reaction, tells her there is nothing wrong with having Down’s Syndrome. When Amber is out in public, people talk to her like she’s a baby.  

Hannah Aylward and Shane Burcaw, How To Cuddle - 5 Amazing Cuddling Tips, 2018, 7:17 min USA 
Squirmy and Grubs is a YouTube channel by Hannah Aylward and Shane Burcaw that details events in their relationship and lives together. In their episode, How to Cuddle - 5 Amazing Cuddling Tips they joke about body size disparity and intimacy. Shane has muscular atrophy. So, for example, he can’t walk and eats with help. Hannah doesn’t have a disability and she helps him with ADLs (activities of daily living). That includes cuddling. They demonstrate their favourite, strangely named positions:  Atrophied Little Spoon, Dweeb Dance and Prenuptial Pigs. These guys are funny, but there is also a tender intimacy in everything they do. And the last position is freaky.  
 
In all four of these films there is evidence of isolation and loneliness. Society and attendants are not very helpful. While facing those difficulties, each person depicted shows bravery and optimism.  These films are revealing, personal accounts of the lives of the subjects.  At times they are funny, and often touching.






FFFF in SFN

Tune In + Mnaandendmowin + Biidaabaan: First Light (see descriptions under Special Projects).
4 pm – 8pm | Saturday, July 27 | James Mason Memorial Culture and Recreation Centre
Interactive Installations



Feast
5:00 pm | Saturday, July 27 | James Mason Memorial Culture and Recreation Centre



Saugeen Takes on Film + Family Time film program
6:00 pm | Saturday, July 27 | James Mason Memorial Culture and Recreation Centre

Sharon Isaac and Kelsey Diamond, Thunder Rolling Home, 2019
Cassidy Ritchie,Tiffany Kewageshig with Adrian Kahgee, Lori Kewaquom, Tune-In, 2019
Natalka Pucan, The Ancestors’ Gift, 2019
This year, the Festival premieres three films made in the Saugeen Takes on Film workshop. By animating archival photographs, artifacts, and traditional knowledge, the filmmakers tap into their vibrant community. Each film comes from a deeply personal place, sensitively navigating past trauma, ancestral presence and overcoming challenges. Friends and families of several generations are pictured in these films and bear witness to this moment in time. The films were made with hand-processing techniques that use flowers to replace chemicals, resulting in an aesthetic that calls to mind abstract painting and mark-making, from ancient times to contemporary painting. More importantly, the flowers have the potential to carry through teachings and healing properties of these plants into the material and subject matter of the film and onto the viewer.  
This project is a result of a collaboration of the Saugeen First Nation Employment and Training Centre, Fabulous Festival of Fringe Film, the Film Farm, and Archive/Counter Archive. We gratefully acknowledge the support of the Ontario Arts Council. 
Following Saugeen Takes on Films are a series of animated shorts and youth films for the whole family selected from the National Film Board’s collection of Indigenous-made films.

Tasha Hubbard, nipawistamasowin: We Will Stand Up, 2019, 98:00 min  
7pm Feature Film    
On August 9, 2016, a young Cree man named Colten Boushie died from a gunshot to the back of his head after entering Gerald Stanley’s rural property with his friends. The jury’s subsequent acquittal of Stanley captured international attention, raising questions about racism embedded within Canada’s legal system and propelling Colten’s family to national and international stages in their pursuit of justice. Sensitively directed by Tasha Hubbard, nîpawistamâsowin: We Will Stand Up weaves a profound narrative encompassing the filmmaker’s own adoption, the stark history of colonialism on the Prairies, and a transformative vision of a future where Indigenous children can live safely on their homelands.